Call 561-374-8461 Se habla español

Alzheimer's Research

Clinical Trials – Myth vs. Fact 

MYTH

FACT

There are already plenty of volunteers.
They don't need me to participate.
Alzheimer’s disease is the only top 10 cause of death in the U.S. without a method to prevent, cure or even slow its progression. New treatments for Alzheimer’s cannot be discovered without clinical trials, and many more participants are needed. At least 50,000 volunteers, both with and without Alzheimer’s, are urgently needed to participate. More than 130 Alzheimer’s clinical studies are now recruiting participants in 545 locations.
It's too late – the disease is too advanced
to participate in a research study.
There are clinical studies that work with people in every stage of Alzheimer's. Participating in a trial could have a potentially measurable impact on the disease.
If I join a clinical trial, I won't receive
the same quality of care that I currently
have with my doctor.
Participants in clinical trials receive a high standard of care. All participants have the opportunity to talk with study staff, and should also continue care with their doctors.

Research shows that people involved in clinical studies do somewhat better than people in a similar stage of their disease who are not enrolled, regardless of whether the experimental treatment works. This may be due to the general high quality of care provided during clinical studies.

If I join a treatment clinical trial, I will get
a placebo, and I don't want that.
In a randomized clinical trial, it is often the case that some of the participants get a placebo as part of the trial design. Each potential participant should consider his or her comfort level in not knowing whether they will receive the experimental treatment or a placebo before deciding to join a trial.1
There won’t be any clinical trials convenient
to me unless I live in a big city, near a major Alzheimer’s disease research center, and/
or have my own means of transportation.
Alzheimer’s disease research is taking place in hundreds of locations throughout the country. Some clinical studies reimburse travel costs, and some may provide compensation to participants. Information about the latest Alzheimer’s disease clinical trials is available through a number of sources.
There may be painful or invasive procedures
as part of the clinical trial.
Each potential clinical trial participant should inquire about the trial design and the potential treatments and procedures they may receive during the study before deciding whether to join a trial. Volunteers can withdraw from a study at any time they or their physician feels it is in their best interest.2
It costs too much to participate in a clinical
trial.
Every clinical trial is designed differently. Some clinical trials reimburse associated travel costs, and some may provide compensation to participants. Still, there may be costs associated with participating, so contact your trial site for information pertaining to a particular trial of interest.
I am going to be rejected from a clinical
trial because I have another disease or
condition, too.
Some people with Alzheimer's disease also have other chronic medical conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes and cancer. However, they may still qualify for a clinical trial. Each clinical study has different inclusion and exclusion criteria. .
If there is a clinical trial that could help me,
my doctor will tell me about it.
More than 130 Alzheimer's clinical studies are currently taking place. Your physician may be unaware of all the research studies in your area. .

References

  1. National Institute on Aging. National Institutes of Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Participating in Alzheimer's Disease Clinical Trials and Studies. August 2014; 14-7484; Accessed Nov. 7, 2014:http://www.nia.nih.gov/alzheimers/publication/participating-alzheimers-research/introduction.
  2. National Institutes of Health, ClinicalTrials.gov, Understanding Clinical Trials, Accessed on April 8, 2010: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/info/understand.